Chevrolet HHR

The Chevrolet HHR is a tall-roofed and well-orchestrated crossover vehicle providing practical cargo space and decent performance. The HHR has a design heritage that goes back over fifty years. The HHR is available as a traditional four-door passenger wagon, or as a two-seat panel van.

Distinctive, Quirky, Practical, Fun, and Comfortable

The Chevrolet HHR - Heritage High Roof - came released in two different body styles, a four-door passenger wagon or as a two-seat panel van. The HHR was also available with one of two different four-cylinder engines, a 2.2-Litre or a 2.4 Litre. There was the choice of a standard five-speed manual transmission or you could opt for the four-speed automatic that came with either engine. Both vehicles were brought out as front-wheel drive. GM's OnStar telematics system is also standard across the HHR model lineup. For 2008, the model lineup was given an impressive boost with the introduction of the HHR SS. This was powered by a 2.0-Litre turbocharged four-cylinder with 260 horsepower of the stick shift manual model, or by the 235 horsepower the automatic models made. That was also the year that introduced the new cargo hauler HHR Panel Van that came without a rear seat and no rear windows. It also had ample storage space with cargo-floor storage compartments as well a rear 40-amp power point was installed for using electronic equipment. The following year the Panel van became available with the SS powertrain, making it an ideal vehicle for small businesses offering an express delivery service. Stability/traction control became standard and there was now an option to have Bluetooth connectivity installed.

Improved Safety for 2010

As an improvement for safety, head curtain airbags became a standard feature on all the trims and a rear-view camera was optional. The LT and SS models now received an upgraded stereo, and the SS was equipped with a sunroof as standard. During 2011 the Chevrolet HHR SS was discontinued and the 2.2-Litre engine became available for LS and LT models that previously couldn't be had on the 2.0-Litre trim. However, the non-SS versions of the HHR came with a particularly soft suspension which was not very impressive for quick maneuvering or encountering tight corners. As well, the electric power steering in the HHR was found to be too light and not very precise in the standard versions, although there was a notable improvement with the revised tuning in the SS model. Natural Resources Canada's fuel consumption ratings at the time were 10.1 L/100 km city and 6.4 L/ 100 km highway for a 2.2L model with the manual transmission; with the automatic, highway consumption increased to 7.1 L/100 km. The 2.4L's ratings weren't far off, at 10.2 L/ 100 km city and 6.8 L/ 100 km highway with the manual, and 10.4 L/ 100 km city and 7.0 L/100 km highway with the automatic.